Articles of the Constitution

Article 1 [Legislative Power]

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Article 1. Section 1.

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Article 1. Section 2.

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Article 1. Section 3.

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Article 1. Section 4.

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Article 1. Section 5.

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Article 1. Section 6.

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Article 1. Section 7.

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Article 1. Section 8.

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Article 1. Section 9.

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Article 1. Section 10.

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Article 1 [Legislative Power] ::: miscellaneous:

Article 1 [Legislative Power] ::: miscellaneous:

Congress

Congress

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Article 2 [Executive power]

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Article 2. Section 1.

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Article 2. Section 2.

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Article 2. Section 3.

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Article 2. Section 4.

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Article 2 [Executive power] ::: miscellaneous:

Article 2 [Executive power] ::: miscellaneous:

Executive Branch

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Article 3 [Judicial power]

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Article 3. Section 3.

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Article 3. Section 2.

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Article 3. Section 1.

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Article 3 [Judicial power] ::: miscellaneous:

Article 3 [Judicial power] ::: miscellaneous:

Judicial Branch

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Article 4 [The states]

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Article 4. Section 1.

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Article 4. Section 2.

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Article 4. Section 3.

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Article 4. Section 4.

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Article 4 [The states] ::: miscellaneous:

Article 4 [The states] ::: miscellaneous:

States

States

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Article 5 [Amendments]

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The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of the Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made prior to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner affect the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article; and that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal Suffrage in the Senate.

Article 5 [Amendments] ::: miscellaneous:

Article 5 [Amendments] ::: miscellaneous:

Amendments

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Article 6 [Federal power]

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All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this Constitution, as under the Confederation.

This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.

The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the Members of the several State Legislatures, and all executive and judicial Officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound by Oath or Affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.

Article 6. Clause 1.

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Article 6. Clause 3.

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Article 6. Clause 2.

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Article 7 [Ratification]

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The Ratification of the Conventions of nine States, shall be sufficient for the Establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the Same.

The Word, "the," being interlined between the seventh and eighth Lines of the first Page, the Word "Thirty" being partly written on an Erazure in the fifteenth Line of the first Page, The Words "is tried" being interlined between the thirty second and thirty third Lines of the first Page and the Word "the" being interlined between the forty third and forty fourth Lines of the second Page.

Attest William Jackson Secretary

done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States present the Seventeenth Day of September in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and Eighty seven and of the Independance of the United States of America the Twelfth In witness whereof We have hereunto subscribed our Names,

G. Washington
Presidt and deputy from Virginia

Delaware
Geo: Read
Gunning Bedford jun
John Dickinson
Richard Bassett
Jaco: Broom

Maryland
James McHenry
Dan of St Thos. Jenifer
Danl. Carroll

Virginia
John Blair
James Madison Jr.

North Carolina
Wm. Blount
Richd. Dobbs Spaight
Hu Williamson

South Carolina
J. Rutledge
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
Charles Pinckney
Pierce Butler

Georgia
William Few
Abr Baldwin

New Hampshire
John Langdon
Nicholas Gilman

Massachusetts
Nathaniel Gorham
Rufus King

Connecticut
Wm. Saml. Johnson
Roger Sherman

New York
Alexander Hamilton

New Jersey
Wil: Livingston
David Brearley
Wm. Paterson
Jona: Dayton

Pennsylvania
B Franklin
Thomas Mifflin
Robt. Morris
Geo. Clymer
Thos. FitzSimons
Jared Ingersoll
James Wilson
Gouv Morris

Articles of the Constitution ::: is part of:

Articles of the Constitution ::: is part of:

U.S. Constitution (Interactive)

U.S. Constitution (Interactive)

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U.S. Constitution (Interactive)
Image Credit: National Archives

In this and related sections we dissect the US Constitution into its parts and subparts. Because many articles from the original constitution have been amended or superseded, we follow the text linking strategy set forth by the National Archives to correlate related texts.[1] While maintaining these important correlations, we also add add a more intuitive format to these correlations and to the text in general.

Desktop users will notice that when certain areas of text are hovered over, the display of related amendments or articles appear in the side margin. We believe that displaying relevant text in this manner makes the Constitution much easier to study and comprehend because the reader is not forced to juggle multiple documents. As stated, we rely on the National Archives to make these important correlations.

In addition to the unique hovering effect, we have also dissected sections down to clause level for the purpose of integration and discussion among other topics. One such example is Article 2, Section 1, Clause 8 which gives context to a series of historical videos on the Presidential Oath of Office.

In summary, we hope that you find our copy of the US Constitution easier to study and comprehend. We also hope to tie in relevant information that provides a deeper understanding of the Constitution and related subjects.

Footnotes:
1.http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html
Preamble

Preamble

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Amendments

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U.S. Constitution (Interactive) ::: is part of:

U.S. Constitution (Interactive) ::: is part of:

United States Government

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